© atelier olschinsky

Archaeological open-air site

© atelier olschinsky

© MAMUZ

Archaeological open-air site

© MAMUZ

© atelier olschinsky

Archaeological open-air site

© atelier olschinsky

© MAMUZ

Archaeological open-air site

© MAMUZ

© MAMUZ

Archaeological open-air site

© MAMUZ

© atelier olschinsky

Archaeological open-air site

© atelier olschinsky

© atelier olschinsky

Archaeological open-air site

© atelier olschinsky

© atelier olschinsky

Archaeological open-air site

© atelier olschinsky

Archaeological open-air site

From the Stone Age to the Iron Age, residential, farming and trade buildings at the archaeological open-air site give a view of past living environments which are hard to imagine today. Huts made of loam and wood show living and working areas displaying the craftsmanship of stonebreakers, weavers, bronze founders and turners. The buildings are centralised in settlements containing arable and garden areas. The first types of cereal – emmer and spelt – can be seen here alongside peas, beans and dye plants.

The settlement complexes are divided into Stone Age, Bronze Age and Iron Age.

The Palaeolithic Age is represented with a tent and a yurt. The lifestyle of people from the Palaeolithic Age can be understood by looking at the weapons and tools found in the tents.
The Neolithic Age is represented using a Neolithic longhouse, a bread baking hut and also a grain field and a well built using Stone Age technology.

A bronze foundry, a large residential building (beam construction) and a small residential building with the corresponding field – on which those plants which were also already available in the Bronze Age are cultivated – represent this era.

In the Iron Age houses it can be seen that the living areas are already more separate, so alongside residential buildings a smithy, a pottery and a bread baking hut can be seen. A Celtic sacred site is the highlight of this settlement complex. The basis for this was a discovery from the Celtic religious district of Roseldorf. It was built including finds from sacred sites in France. It is a model which is unique worldwide. The Celtic meeting house is another remarkable building in this residential area. It was built on the basis of a discovery from Michelstetten (town of Asparn). Archaeologists assume that in the meeting house splendid weapons, chariots, horse harnesses, war trophies and booty were stored that were displayed at meetings of warriors, celebrations and feasts.

The houses are all models of buildings based on archaeological digs. In the interior everyday items can be seen which make the living environment of our ancestors come alive.

The last part of the round tour is dedicated to the implementation of prehistoric technologies. Here, for example, students from the Department of Experimental Archaeology at the University of Vienna meet each year to recreate prehistoric handiwork. As well as smelting ovens and an anvil, grinding stones to grind grain and clay cupola furnaces to bake bread can be seen.

At the historical festivals the open-air site is full of life – when Stone Age hunters, Celts and Huns camp and visitors are invited to join in the celebrations.

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